Machinefabriek – “Becoming”

Well, where do I start with such a beautiful, chrysalis-like album? I will struggle to put into words the experiential beauty I felt when I listened to this album – but I will try my utmost.

I was contacted by Machinefabriek on the off-chance I would have the time to listen to the release. This album, “Becoming” is the fourth dance piece by Dutch/Spanish choreographer Iván Pérez to feature an original soundtrack by Rutger Zuydervelt (Machinefabriek). After ‘Hide & Seek’, ‘Attention The Doors Are Closing’, and ‘Exhausting Space’, Pérez/Zuydervelt sharpened their collaborative skills with a new piece – by having the music performed live on stage for the first time.

The choreography and music were created simultaneously, rehearsing together, and developing a movement and sound ‘vocabulary’ for the piece. The end result is structured, but still leaves a lot of room for improvisation in order to keep a natural flow. Each performance was different, with the musician and the dancers (Wei Yun Chen, Majon van der Schot, and Christopher Tandy) having a real-time dialogue.

“Becoming” is really inspirational stuff and, oh, so achingly beautiful. Whether it is the peal of a Sopranos voice looped, softly, or an oh-so-gentle analogue hum; this is a masterpiece. Now the, I appreciate that the term masterpiece is overused, but – on “Becoming” Zuydervelt leaves us hanging as to his next move – we are unsurely placed between two ‘scenes’ of the music – flowing softly into each other and immersing us like a lover’s first embrace.

The version of the album released here presents a glimpse of the score that was edited from material recorded during the last rehearsal period for the piece. As a digital bonus (with the cd as well as the download), it includes a 46-minute live recording made at the prèmiere at the Operaestate Festival in Bassano, Italy.

… oh, to have seen this performed live. The music alone is of an exceptionally high standard – true artistry.

Above – You Can See The Instruments Used For The Real-Time Composition

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